Marketers call for more robust metrics from influencers

15 september 2016
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influencer

Marketers have called on social media influencers to provide more robust metrics as ISBA rolls out a new contract to help brands work more effectively with them.

Last week, ISBA attempted to standardise the industry’s previously “hotchpotch” approach to formalising relationships between vloggers and brands by launching a new contract for its members to use as a framework.

The contract, which was drafted by law firm Lewis Silkin with input from Zoella’s talent agency Gleam Futures, includes guidance on how social influencers should label paid-for content and how they should be paid for it.

Despite the publicity around the reach of bloggers such as Zoella and her boyfriend Alfie Deyes, who drew a bigger crowd to his book-signing in 2014 than David Beckham, some marketers have yet to be convinced of their role within the wider marketing mix.

Last week, ISBA attempted to standardise the industry’s previously “hotchpotch” approach to formalising relationships between vloggers and brands by launching a new contract for its members to use as a framework.

The contract, which was drafted by law firm Lewis Silkin with input from Zoella’s talent agency Gleam Futures, includes guidance on how social influencers should label paid-for content and how they should be paid for it.

Despite the publicity around the reach of bloggers such as Zoella and her boyfriend Alfie Deyes, who drew a bigger crowd to his book-signing in 2014 than David Beckham, some marketers have yet to be convinced of their role within the wider marketing mix.

Ash Tailor, global brand and marketing director at Britvic, said: “There is so much pressure and cost involved to develop relevant content. It is easy to be seduced by followers, views and ‘likes’.

“The concern I have is ensuring transparency of tracking and data that adds true value to brand performance and growth. It’s hard for marketers to acquire all data to fully measure influencer impact.”

Last year, GlobalWebIndex found that vlogs are the least popular way to discover brands, even among people who watch them regularly. Only 19% of people surveyed said they discovered brands through blogs, versus 59% through ads seen online and 58% through TV and radio ads.

Bron en volledig artikel: Campaign

 

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